Discussion: Competency Case Dilemma

Discussion: Competency Case Dilemma

Discussion: Competency Case Dilemma

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Competency Case Dilemma
In a 1,050- to 1,400-word (or 3- to 4-page) paper (excluding references and title page), discuss a competency-related scenario or a case of your choice, either from our readings or related to a situation that you have encountered in which you address the specific steps you would take to embrace ethical practices in your work. In what ways does the scenario you have selected present an ethical, legal, professional, or moral problem related to competency issues? In what way does your professional code of conduct offer possible solutions or opportunities for resolution? What are the implications of your ethical decision-making and actions for the client in this case, for those related to the client, and for you as a professional? In addition to the required readings, cite at least two additional references.

Point Value: 9 Points
Weekly Learning Outcome Alignment: 3
Course Learning Outcome Alignment: 1, 2, 4, 6

Resources
Required References
Anderson, A., Barenberg, L., & Tremblay, P. R. (2006). Professional ethics in interdisciplinary collaboratives: Zeal, paternalism and mandated reporting. Clinical Law Review, 13. 659-718.

Ashley, G. C., & Reiter-Palmon, R. (2012, September). Self-awareness and the evolution of leaders: The need for a better measure of self-awareness. Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, 14(1), 2-17.

Caldwell, C. (2009). Identity, self-awareness, and self-deception: Ethical implications for leaders and organizations. Journal of Business Ethics, 90, 393-406

Hunter, S. T. (2012, April). (Un)ethical leadership and identity: What did we learn and where do we go from here? Journal of Business Ethics, 107(1), 79-87.

Johnson, W. B., Barnett, J. E., Elman, N. S., Forrest, L., & Kaslow, N. J. (2012,

October). The competent community: Toward a vital reformulation of professional ethics. American Psychologist, 67(7), 557-566.

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes. Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages. Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor. The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.