Discussion-2: Qualitative Study

Discussion-2: Qualitative Study

Discussion-2: Qualitative Study

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Learning Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

Saldaña, J. (2016). The coding manual for qualitative researchers (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Chapter 1, “An Introduction to Codes and Coding” (pp. 1–42)

Chapter 2, “Writing Analytic Memos About Narrative and Visual Data” (pp. 43–65)

Ravitch, S. M., & Carl, N. M. (2016). Qualitative research: Bridging the conceptual, theoretical, and methodological. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Chapter 7, “An Integrative Approach to Data Analysis” (pp. 215–236)

Chapter 8, “Methods and Processes of Data Analysis” (pp. 237–270)

Rubin, H. J., & Rubin, I. S. (2012). Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Chapter 12, “Data Analysis in the Responsive Interviewing Model” (pp. 189–211)

The following articles are examples of literature reviews on the aspects of social change. Choose one of the articles for this week’s Discussion 2.

Thomas, E. F., McGarty, C., & Mavor, K. I. (2009). Transforming “apathy into movement”: The role of prosocial emotions in motivation action for social change. Personality & Social Psychology Review, 13(4), 310–333.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Kezar, A. (2014). Higher education change and social networks: A review of the research. Journal of Higher Education, 85(1), 91–125.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Aguinis, H., & Glavas, A. (2012). What we know and don’t know about corporate social responsibility: A review and research agenda. Journal of Management, 38(4), 932–968.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Walden University. (2015). Social change. Retrieved from https://www.waldenu.edu/about/social-change

As you review this website, think about Walden’s meaning of social change and how this website will guide you as you consider positive social change for your Major Assignment 2.

Document: Excel Video Coding Document Template (Excel spreadsheet)

Review this Excel template as you view this week’s media programs. Also, you will use this template for organizing your transcripts and preparing them for coding.

To prepare for this Discussion:

Choose one of the three social change literature review articles found in this week’s Learning Resources and review the article in detail.

Explore the Walden Social Change website and locate an additional document, video, or webpage that will inform your understanding of the meaning of positive social change. Reflect on any additional sources you find.

Next, write field notes based on the information you gathered from the Walden social change website and any other documents or websites that might inform your changing impressions about the meaning of positive social change.

Finally, review the media programs related to coding and consider how you will use this information to support this Discussion. Note: In your Excel Video Coding template there is a tab for your website data. Use this tab to place your content and codes for the website.

Prepare a brief explanation of your understanding of the meaning of positive social change thus far. Refer to the additional sources you have reviewed this week, and comment on how they are shaping your experience. Use the data you gathered from your analytic memo to support your explanation.

Be sure to support your main post and response post with reference to the week’s Learning Resources and other scholarly evidence in APA style.

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes. Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages. Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor. The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.