A post critiquing a Change Effort

A post critiquing a Change Effort

A post critiquing a Change Effort

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As a nurse leader, you need to have the skills and knowledge to collaborate and communicate with those who plan for and manage change. This capacity is valuable in any health care setting and for many different types of change. Furthermore, it is essential to be able to evaluate a change effort and determine if it is promoting improved outcomes and making a positive difference within the department or unit, or for the organization as a whole.

To prepare:

  • Review Chapters 7 and 8 in the course text. Focus on the strategies for planning and implementing change in an organization, as well as the roles of nurses, managers, and other health care professionals throughout this process.
  • Reflect on a specific change that has recently occurred in your organization or one in which you have worked previously. What was the catalyst or purpose of the change?
  • How did the change affect your job and responsibilities?
  • Consider the results of the change and whether or not the intended outcomes have been achieved.
  • Was the change managed skillfully? Why or why not? How might the process have been improved?

Post  (1) a summary of a specific change within an organization and describe the impact of this change on your role and responsibilities. (2) Explain the rationale for the change, and whether or not the intended outcomes have been met. (3) Assess the management of the change, and propose suggestions for how the process could have been improved.

Readings

  • Marquis, B. L., & Huston, C. J. (2015). Leadership roles and management functions in nursing: Theory and application(8th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
    • Review Chapter 7, “Strategic and Operational Planning”
    • Chapter 8, “Planned Change”This chapter explores methods for facilitating change and the theoretical underpinnings of implementing effective change
  • McAlearney, A., Terris, D., Hardacre, J., Spurgeon, P. Brown, C.,  Baumgart, A.,  Nyström, M. (2014). Organizational coherence in health care organizations: Conceptual guidance to facilitate quality improvement and organizational change. Quality Management in Health Care, 23(4), 254-267 doi: 10.1097/QMH.0b013e31828bc37dAn international group of investigators explored the issues of organizational culture and Quality Improvement (QI) in different health care contexts and settings. The aim of the research was to examine if a core set of organizational cultural attributes are associated with successful QI systems.
  • Mitchell, G. (2013). Selecting the best theory to implement planned change. Nursing Management – UK, 20(1), 32-37. doi: 10.7748/nm2013.04.20.1.32.e1013Abstract: Planned change in nursing practice is necessary for a wide range of reasons, but it can be challenging to implement. Understanding and using a change theory framework can help managers or other change agents to increase the likelihood of success. This article considers three change theories and discusses how one in particular can be used in practice.

Shirey, M. R. (2013). Lewin’s Theory of Planned Change as a strategic resource. The Journal of Nursing Administration, 43(2), 69-72. doi:10.1097/NNA.0b013e31827f20a9

Abstract: This department [manuscript] highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author explores the use of the Lewin’s Theory of Planned Change as a strategic resource to mobilize the people side of change. An overview of the theory is provided along with a discussion of its strengths, limitations, and targeted application.

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes. Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages. Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor. The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.